Stop the Friction! Answer These Product Questions for Consumers

Stop the Friction! Answer These Product Questions for Consumers

Recent customer experience data found 74% of consumers expect clear communication and 71% expect to easily find what they’re looking for. On top of that, when customers meet friction online, only the determined 1% reach out — the rest abandon the site or shop with a competitor. In other words, if you aren’t communicating clearly and proactively with your customers from the start, then you may not get the opportunity to communicate with them at all.

When it comes to friction, one of the most common points of struggle we see across industries is accessing and understanding product information. Consumers have all sorts of questions about the products you offer, many of which are basic and predictable. When it comes to these questions, we often see brands take one of two approaches:

Approach #1: Provide general product information and wait for consumers to reach out to you with other questions. This approach leads to a large amount of site abandonment. (Refer to the stat above: only 1% of consumers reach out when they encounter buying friction.) The people who do reach out can overwhelm your contact center agents whose time would be better spent answering complicated or unique questions.

Approach #2: In an effort to provide consumers with all the product information they need, share as much content as possible. This approach generates information overload, making it hard for customers to find the specific information they are looking for and overwhelming them, which leads to frustration and abandonment.

Good news — there’s a third approach. This one involves contextual guidance to create a successful customer experience. What does that mean? It means using advance AI to provide information or encourage self-service where and when consumers need it, lessening abandonment, increasing conversions, and improving efficiency. Not to mention, getting out ahead of basic, predictable questions frees up agent time for issues that actually require human intervention.

To get you started, we’ve listed out the top product information questions consumers have by industry and suggested ways you can proactively guide customers through these parts of the digital journey. Note: you won’t see any reference to account log in issues or basic account issues. These customer struggle points are so prevalent, we’ve covered those in separate blog posts.

For Banking

The most common product information questions consumers have for banks are:

  1. What information do I need to open a joint account?
  2. How do I pick the right account for me?
  3. How do I set up direct deposit?

Here’s how to guide your customers with proactive answers and self-service on the product selection pages of your website:

  1. When a visitor clicks on “joint account,” provide contextual guidance that explains the requirements.
  2. Proactively offer an account “buying guide” that walks your user through the difference in accounts.
  3. Offer a direct deposit setup video when a new customer logs in for the first time.

For Insurance

The most common online quoting questions consumers have for insurers are:

  1. What are the coverage options and pricing for different policies?
  2. How do I know I’ve selected adequate coverage?
  3. What do terms like beneficiary, annuity, etc. mean?

Here’s how to guide your customers with proactive answers and self-service on the product selection pages of your website:

  1. Provide a link to a complete coverage list when a customer selects coverage level.
  2. Provide example coverage scenarios and levels in layman’s terms.
  3. Proactively provide a glossary of terms.

For Retail

The most common item availability questions consumers have for retailers:

  1. Do you carry this item?
  2. How long will this item be out of stock or backordered?
  3. Why is your selection limited?

Here’s how to guide your customers with proactive answers and self-service on the product selection pages of your website:

  1. Provide more information about the status of the item.
  2. Guide your customers to information on item availability.
  3. Inform your customers if items in their cart are out of stock or backordered.